Fujifilm X-T5 launched: compact system camera with hefty resolution

Fujifilm recently launched its new system camera X-T5, with a number of technological innovations. Firstly, this is a compact system camera equipped with an APS-C chip with a whopping 40 megapixels.

Fujifilm recently launched its new system camera X-T5, with a number of technological innovations. Firstly, this is a compact system camera equipped with an APS-C chip with a whopping 40 megapixels. The same chip already exists in Fujifilm's own X-H2, and is the highest resolution ever on an image Chip of this size. 160 megapixels If a resolution of 40 megapixels is not enough, you can use a feature that Hasselblad was the first to develop, where the camera's chip-based image stabilizer moves the image Chip slightly between each exposure. In this way, the camera can stitch together multiple exposures into one image with a whopping 160 megapixels. Of course, you have to use the camera on a tripod and have a stationary subject. This is not something you photograph troubled children, footballers or race cars with. The camera's chip has a standard sensitivity of 125 ISO, and can set an electronic shutter speed of as much as 1/180, 000 second. Earlier models had 1/32, 000 second as the fastest shutter speed with the electronics. Regulators are concerned about the trend in Twitter With electronic shutter, the X-T5 should manage up to 20 frames per second, while with mechanical shutter, the maximum speed will go down to 15 frames per second. Of course, you can also shoot video with the X-T5, and the maximum quality is 6K at 30 frames per second, or 4K at 60 frames per second. With regular FullHD, it will be able to cope with up to 240 frames per second on video. Fujifilm X-T5 will be available in

Norway at the end of november 2022

And the suggested price will be as follows:X-T5 camera body: Kr 21.999,- X-T5 with XF 18-55mm lens: Kr25. 999,- X-T5 with XF 16-80mm lens: Kr 26.999,- Fujifilm's special chip technology Fujifilm developed its own chip technology that can provide sharper images and better color reproduction at the pixel level, And The X-T5's Image chip is a further development of this. In short, almost all digital cameras use a so-called Bayer pattern. A pixel sensor is basically not able to see color, only different degrees of intensity of light, which is then converted into electrical signals. By placing a colored filter over the image chip, so that some pixels are red, some are blue, and some are green, the camera can work out what the colors should be. The problem with a Bayer pattern is that 50 percent of the pixels are green, while the rest are equally divided into red and blue. This means that every second line and column lacks these colors, and the camera then has to strictly figure out how the picture should be on a slightly failing basis. What Fujifilm has done with its chip technology is that they use a larger repeating pattern than the Bayer pattern's 2x2. Even if the distribution of the colors is approximately the same, one can thus get that all lines and columns have data from all the colors. In this way, you can get both sharper images and better color reproduction. But it's not free. A larger pattern requires more computing power, and more computing power means greater power consumption. This made this solution not available in the infancy of the digital camera, but a few years ago the technology had progressed far enough that this was a possible solution.

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